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Three Visiting Experts Urge Women to Get Their Partners Treated for Premature Ejaculation

  • Premature ejaculation is a common condition where more than 9 in 10 men who have experienced its symptoms fail to seek treatment
  • Premature ejaculation has shown to have a great impact on women

Singapore, 7 March 2014 – The facts and figures are in: Singaporean women just aren’t sexually satisfied.

According to published studies on premature ejaculation (PE), it affects 34% of men in Singapore at some point in their lives.[i]

A recent 2013 Asia-Pacific Sexual Behaviours and Satisfaction Survey[ii] revealed that 61% of men and 39% of women in Singapore believe that the man’s ability to control when to ejaculate is critical to achieving mutual sexual satisfaction, and the desired intimacy of successful relationships.

However, more than 9 in 10 men in Singapore who reported to have experienced PE have not sought treatment, creating a heavy impact on their partners.

This burden is apparent as 1 in 5 (20%) Singaporean women who feel their partners might have PE believe it could potentially lead to actual relationship breakdown or divorce.

Menarini Singapore has brought in three regional experts to address the issue of premature ejaculation and sexual dissatisfaction between couples at the urology conference, Urofair 2014.

The experts are:

  • Dr Angela Ng, Family Physician and Certified Sex Therapist, Hong Kong
  • Professor Marita McCabe, Professor of Psychology, Australia
  • Professor George Lee, Associate Professor and Consultant Urological Surgeon, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Sexual satisfaction and frequency of sex is vital for an intimate relationship

While the Asia Pacific average is 7.7 times a month, Singaporean couples have less frequent intimate sessions, enjoying sex only 5.6 times a month.2

“One of the major factors affecting sexual satisfaction is frequency of sex. Couples must make time for sexual relations regardless of how busy their work life is. Love and loving cannot be left on the shelf. Premature ejaculation is a common condition in both young and older men. There is no reason to delay the visit to the doctor,” explains Dr Angela Ng.

Sexual dysfunction has great impact on women

Professor Marita McCabe adds, “While PE places a great burden on its male sufferers, affecting self-esteem and sexual confidence, the impact on women is often forgotten and ignored. Women play an important role in encouraging their partners to seek help and speak to a doctor, however many do not due to a lack of understanding of the condition.”

PE is a medical condition that can be treated

PE is recognised as a medical condition by global health organisations such as the World Health Organization (WHO), the International Society of Sexual Medicine (ISSM), European Association of Urology (EAU), and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Reports have shown that only 38% of partners of men with PE are satisfied during sexual intercourse, compared with 90% of partners of men without PE.[i]

“PE is a common condition that can be treated. Women should lead their men to the doctor’s clinic and improve their sexual health and wellbeing,” said Professor George Lee.


About premature ejaculation (PE)

PE is the most common sexual dysfunction in men and is characterised by difficulty in controlling ejaculation. PE is recognized as a medical condition by global health organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO), the International Society of Sexual Medicine (ISSM), European Association of Urology (EAU), and the American Psychological Association (APA).[i],[ii],[iii],[iv] Effective treatment of PE can not only improve control over ejaculation but also improve sexual satisfaction and overall quality of life for both men and their partners.4,[v]

For further information on PE, visit

About the 2013 Asia-Pacific Sexual Behaviours and Satisfaction Survey2

The 2013 Asia-Pacific Sexual Behaviours and Satisfaction Survey polled more than 3,500 men and women aged 18-45 years old from nine markets in Asia-Pacific, including Australia, China, Hong Kong, South Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan and Thailand, to understand the impact premature ejaculation has on couples’ relationships and sexual satisfaction. The survey, conducted by Kantar Health and sponsored by Menarini Asia-Pacific, was conducted between 18 March 2013 and 2 April 2013, and incorporated the five-question Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool (PEDT), a validated instrument for diagnosing premature ejaculation. Menarini is committed to raising awareness of premature ejaculation (PE), which is under detected, underdiagnosed and undertreated.[vi]

About Menarini Asia-Pacific

Menarini is the world’s largest Italian biopharmaceutical company with a heritage of over 128 years and has over 16,000 employees in over 100 countries. Here in Asia-Pacific, Menarini’s vision is to be a leading provider of important healthcare brands to improve the lives of people in the region. Menarini Asia-Pacific operates across the entire commercial value chain, from regulatory approval and product launch to lifecycle management with a diverse portfolio of proprietary and partnered brands in key therapeutic fields, including Dermatology, Primary Care, Allergy/Respiratory, Cardiovascular, Select Specialty Care, Men’s Health and Consumer Health.

For further information, please visit:

For Media Queries:

Weber Shandwick

Lauren Hendry Parsons


Tel: +65 6825 8059

Manna Talib (Ms)


Tel: +65 6825 8025

[i] Althof SE, Abdo CH, Dean J, Hackett G, McCabe M, McMahon CG, et al. International Society for Sexual Medicine’s guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of premature ejaculation. J Sex Med 2010;7(9):2947-69.

[ii] World Health Organization. International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Edition. Geneva: World Health Organization, 1994.

[iii] Wespes E, Eardley I, Giuliano F, Hatzichristou D, Hatzimouratidis K, Moncada A, et al. European Association of Urology: Guidelines Male Sexual Dysfunction: Erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation. [Internet] March 2013 [cited 01 Jul 2013]. Available from:

[iv] American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. 4th ed. Washington, DC: APA Press;1994.

[v] McCarty E, Dinsmore W. Dapoxetine: an evidence-based review of its effectiveness in treatment of premature ejaculation. Core Evid. 2012;7:1–14

[vi] McMahon CG, Lee G, Park JK, Adaikan PG. Premature ejaculation and erectile dysfunction prevalence and attitudes in the Asia-Pacific region. J Sex Med 2012;9(2):454-65.

[i] Patrick et al. J Sex Med 2005;2:358-367

[i] Adaikan PG, Lim P. Ng KK, Fock E. Asia Perspective: Premature Ejaculation Prevalence and Attitudes (PEPA) among Singaporean Men. J Men’s Health. 2011: 8(Suppl. 1): S84-86

[ii] 2013 Asia-Pacific Sexual Behaviours and Satisfaction Survey, May 2013.

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